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20120901
20120930
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general motors building here in detroit is one of the state leased buildings i've ever been in. in fact it was the largest office building in the world and its designated as the national historic landmark. as with many landmarks there's also a legend behind that building. general motors the longer occupies the site, but if you go there today and bring a pair of binoculars you can still see the letter d carved into the corners of each corner above the 15th floor. the building was originally going to be named the durant building in honor of the company's founder. they had already cut the letter d into the corners when he was thrown out of the company he created. when the building was finished was called the general motors building, but nobody got around to removing it. the legend of course is that the letter d was billy's way of getting back to the management team that threw him out, all of whom had been brought into general motors. the point of the story is even though they lot of people here in detroit know about the letter d, i always found that not many people seem to know or care abo
into a white neighborhood in detroit. it was the summer that the klan had marched down pennsylvania avenue. you might remember the photos from our history books and high-school, all of those folks in white robes walking with the capitol behind them. in detroit a mob gathered pricking the windows of the house threatening its inhabitants. he and his family and friends fired that crowd killing one man and injuring another, there were charged with murder. defending into a grueling trial that spanned seven months for a token fee raised by the naacp. he won the case but was staggered by a heart attack in the summer of 1926 and was never the same. the great theme block -- the long war that he fought in is much to the courtrooms and cases was the defense of individual liberty from the relentless crushing and personal forces of modernity. no era of the world has witnessed such a rapid concentration of wealth and power as this one. history furnishes about the lessons of the inevitable result . liberty produced prosperity and this prosperity books with doubting i upon the mother liberty you give it breath
when they moved north to places like chicago, detroit. now blacks are coming back to the south. impossible! don't the black people know the south is full of red necks and racist. what black families know to the contrary is that the south has better jobs and a better economic future and more important. it's a better place to raise their kids. put this way. they don't say learn to say yes, sir or no, sir. they learn that in places like montgomery. the mason dickinson line shows up. it's better to be on the southern side. how much better? the numbers don't lie. according to the latest census figure it was the fastest growing region. they moving to texas at 100 a day. that's why factories open in southern states and bmw opens places in atlantic. the american liberal looks upon this and hates the south like an east berlin hated west berlin. around the world we with have seen it time and time again. this is universal truth of history. the south fulfills the same role today. it's existence the heritage and the prosperity expose the liberal project is the -- that's why liberals hate th
. in places like detroit, more than only 3% are proficient. roughly two years ago i stumbled on the work of jeffrey. i was blown away to see that after, those who are lottery then, after four years, there was an achievement gap in math to apply for the lottery and the average licensing and all of your city. i have to say this on c-span just in case she is watching. one christmas i was alone in cambridge, massachusetts, and i was feeling the holiday blues and i wanted to make my grandmother's coconut cake. and she said oh, it's really simple. you start with two cups of sugar, you boil it. and i said, dan? and she gave me directions that sounded like -- i went to my grandmother's house around thanksgiving and i just annoyed her in the kitchen. but she would grab the flour with her hands and i would put up underneath. and i would sprinkle the flour in and i backed out the recipe. again, it annoyed her, but i had a recipe that i can now give my children and grandchildren. we spent two years trying to do something like that with charter schools. the average charter school is no different than
an exclusive contract to train detroit and chicago on a particular vail road line, you were able to maintain that line at a much cheaper cost and instead of having to use rose, having tedious bushwhacker the country. and by establishing this exclusive right-of-way railroads, they got very cheap telegraph service. the telegraph companies got the rights of way. by establishing those arrangements and usual contractual agreements that the courts are reluctant to challenge in congress was reluctant to challenge, although it did, by doing that he was able to get around the limitations that state lawmakers had placed on telegraph companies to the antenna not really telegraph us. and those laws had been enacted as a response to morris. so you have morris who fails because of the estate primetime monopoly luscombe is simply succeeds by ingeniously using the affair was to create the kind of monopolies the state has. >> are there any comparisons today for rice to at&t in broadband and cell towers et cetera? pasco here's the comparison that intrigues me. congress enacted a law opened up competition just
are proficient in math or reading and in places like detroit roughly 3% are proficient. i tried to calculate how many kids that might be. it is roughly 132 that are proficient in math in a place like detroit. over the past few years we have -- i have tried to figure out through lots of failures and a tiny bit of progress what we can actually do about those facts. two years ago i stumbled on the work of the harlem children and we did an evaluation. i was pretty blown away to see that after four years his students who were lotteryed in, good for them after four years he had to raise the achievement gap in math between the average black students who applied for the lottery and the average white students in all of new york city and cutting the third the gap in english-language arts. i thought that was real progress and i wanted to understand how we could do that for all kids. we went and it reminds me of my grandmother's baking time. i am sure you could say i am certain you have nothing on my grandmother. i needed to say that on c-span just because she is watching. my grandmother is an absolutely fa
through his story. he supposedly models nathan detroit on it. this is a movie based on his death, downin .. 1934. which is starring spencer tracy, it would seem it would go against taxing. murray golden was enough. he is well-known to many interesting thing about when he dies his you'd think the headlines would say, arnold rothstein, shot. and the dislike, none of that. that is what way, way, way down if at all in the story, because he is so much involved with everything else. kaj: >> before we go to the call, david pietrusza, how contested was the 1960 democratic primary? >> that is interesting because it is still so very different from the process today. when you say primary, it is interesting, because we should bey. when you say primary, it is interesting, because we should be talking primaries. but in 1960, we are talking primaries roughly plural, they're two of them. two of consequence, zero consequence for the republicans. but the democratic primaries involve, or the wisconsin primaries, hubert humphrey versus john f. kennedy in the west virginia primary, same two contenders, and i
and dolls" which comes later, damon runnion supposedly models nathan detroit on him. and there's a movie which stars spencer tracy which seems to go against casting. but, yes, he is well known, and the interesting thing about when he dies. you would thick the headlines would say, arnold rothstein, shot, and it's like none of that. that is way, way, way down, if at all in the stories because he is so much more involved in everything else than that. ... >> before we go to the call, david pietrusza, how contested was the 1960 democratic primary? >> that is interesting because it is still so very different from the process today. when you say primary, it is interesting, because we should bey. when you say primary, it is interesting, because we should be talking primaries. but in 1960, we are talking primaries roughly plural, they're two of them. two of consequence, zero consequence for the republicans. but the democratic primaries involve, or the wisconsin primaries, hubert humphrey versus john f. kennedy in the west virginia primary, same two contenders, and it is almost like a stalking hor
from industrial farm in california and a produce section and a wal-mart near detroit to a chain restaurant kitchen in brooklyn. in her book she profiles the people who worked alongside her at each job and reports on herxÑ attempt to eat well on reduced wages. this is an hour and a half. >> can you hemi? okay? suffers want to introduce the rest of the panel. starting to my left is thank you. i practiced the. annia is the author of the 2011 memoir, "day of honey: a memoir of food, love, and war." called one of the least political and most intimate and valuable books to come out of the iraq war by "the new york times" dwight garner. it's just out in paperback. her coverage of the cultural politics of the middle east and the new york times, the "washington post," "saveur," in the nation has been recognized, and included in the best food writing series. welcome, annia. [applause] >> to the left of annia is amanda, the cofounder of food 52.com and author of the essential new times cookbook for which she won an award. a longtime staffer for the new york times, she has authored, edited
everybody. i'm a senior legal communications major in detroit, michigan. i'm also serve as the president of the naacp and i'm ecstatic system for impact which is a nonprofit here in d.c. that is a rancid of a geisha political involvement and -- specs beat up a little slower, a little slower and louder spent my name is crystal, i'm a senior legal communications major hailing from the great city of detroit, michigan, and on campus i serve as the president of our naacp and a must have existed for impact. my question is for anyone that wants to address this question. uganda spoke about the consistency of african-americans been active in the political process, things of that nature and would make that almost sound like an issue of our generation when that's an issue of every generations i wanted to know just decides and how active we are not in the process, the past presidential years, how can we keep people active all year round? >> anre? >> i can speak to what we've done actively, coming out of -- >> hold on a second. can the folks who are leaving try to keep it down so we can hear what's g
. 44% in the detroit metro area, president obama had it in 2008. there is not much going on there for mitt romney. there is a three-point increase on the minority voters, seven-point decline among white, noncollege voters, eligible voters. these are huge changes and they go exactly against what is in the interest of the romney team. the romney team in wisconsin. maybe if they thought they would be able to take advantage what they believed to be this conservative white working-class voters by electing nominating paul ryan. they are making some progress, according to the poll, but some progress among white college graduates, but it's not anywhere close to what needs to take place. florida is a state, let's face it, if the romney campaign loses florida, chances of winning the 2012 election are close to zero. if we look at the pattern of support among the white working class, 17 points in 2008. we are not seeing any noticeably eager margin since 2008 among white working class voters. that is also being translated into similar margins in places like the corridor of the center
on the side of obama. look again at the geographical pattern of the vote, running in the detroit metro area, 44% of the statewide vote as he did in 2008. not much going on there for romney. wisconsin is a state where if you're going to crack the midwest code, given what was happening with ohio, they thought perhaps they could do it in wisconsin. the problem is twofold for them. one is if you look at the level of demographic change that's taking place in wisconsin, it's quite startling according to these current data. a three-point increase in a share of minority eligible voters. a seven-point decline among white noncollege voters, eligible voters. these are huge changes and odyssey they do exactly against within inches of the romney team in wisconsin. so maybe they thought if they nominate paul ryan they would be able to take advantage what they believe to be this massive culturally conservative white working-class voters in the state but again it doesn't seem to be happening. they are making some progress, some progress among current nine but it's not anywhere close to what's needed to tak
students are proficient in math or in reading. and in fact in places like detroit, roughly 3% are so over breakfast this morning he tried to calculate how many kids might be, roughly 132 that are proficient in math and a in a place like detroit. so over the past few years, we have, i have tried to figure out through lots of failures and a tiny bit of progress, what we can actually do about those facts and roughly two years ago i stumbled on the work of jeffrey canon kannon of the harlem children's fund. i was pretty blown away to see that after four years of his students who were -- lottery again. lots of kids were lottery gao. after four years he get an achievement gap in math between the average black student who applied for his lottery and the average white student in all of new york city. and a cut in one third the gaps in -- i thought that was real progress and i wanted to understand how we could do that for all kids. and so we planned and it reminds me of my grandmother's baking. i see a lot of people in the audience and i'm sure you can cook well but i'm sure you have nothing on my
, the guy coming into detroit was all foreign derived. i think it was mistake to mirandize him in 50 minutes because our base of him is foreign intelligence. to me the right entry point was, enemy combatant, nation at war, deal with it that way. on the other hand if someone is discovered and prevented in an attack in the united states by the fbi the roots of that information are law enforcement derived. the going in position is we ought to treat this as a law enforcement problem and enter this into the american court system. i suppose if we stayed her long enough we could think of exceptions but in broad measure my sense is that is how we should deal with it. i hope made it worth your while coming here this afternoon. i hope you have left with more questions than you had when you came in. that was my intent. and thank you very much for the opportunity. and, go air force. [applause] >> live coverage at the top of the hour from the brookings institution hosting a discussion on national defense issues and the 2012 presidential election begins at 1:00 p.m. eastern on our companion network c-span
that looked a lot like the spirit of st. louis. it was a detroiter. and enter the american girl. she told the press if an american boy can have great dreams, why can't an american girl? and she took off. she made it as far as -- and she crashed in the sea but she crashed with inside of in her weekend anchor, and they saved her. she very, perhaps more than any of the other flyers, she understood the new world of celebrity. because she said early on, anybody who flies, the first woman who flies across is going to be famous to they're going to make money. they're going to be famous. i don't want to go back to the life of a dental hygienist in florida. why shouldn't i do this? this is my way out. when you're looking in these archives, there were all of these letters to these flyers, from men and women. for the most saying take me along, take me along. of the most poignant were from women. at all these women saw, you know, there was one letter from a woman who had seven children by five had died. there was one woman who had slung burgers in philadelphia, and she offered to bring food. all of t
of our speaker. washington bureau chief of the detroit news. thank you for joining us today. the unions have given their time, labor and money to democrats only occasionally breaking with tradition to endorse republican for president as it did with ronald reagan and george h. w. bush they will support field of the reelection campaign. james hoffa says the labor union supports president obama and has criticized republicans and mitt romney for favoring ceos over workers. after the rnc convention he told the "huffington post" net romney once to annihilate labor workers. the obama administrations has been a mixed bag. even when democrats dominated the house and senate some say they took labor support for granted when they took self carolina to host last week's convention. and the free-trade agreement printer hurt american workers. the unions must juggle the demands of members wild businesses big for mercy in a weak economy. earlier this week the fedex ceo had to loosen his grip to allow the independent chairman to toe the line of escalating pay in seven of cutting jobs. at know whether time
bankrupt. presidential candidates said -- i believe his words were along the lines of to detroit drop dead, that it wasn't something we wanted to do, to do anything to help that industry. they were willing to let the auto industry go bankrupt and then see what happens. they thought it was okay, some of these naysayers thought it was okay to bail out wall street, they thought it was okay to pad the salaries of reckless bankers who drove our economy off a cliff. it wasn't the auto worker, the nonunion auto worker in marysville that built the honda. it wasn't the chrysler auto worker in toledo that built the wrangler or liberty, it wasn't the chevy auto worker in lordstown that built the cruze, it wasn't the auto worker in defiance that built the engine or the glass worker in crestline that made the glass or the steelworker or the mill worker, it wasn't they who caused the collapse of this economy and caused the problems with the banks, but in many ways, they were blamed by the people who bet against america who were willing to say it's okay to pad the salary of reckless bankers even though t
that sort of hoax in what you are talking about. it makes me feel shameful. >> one quick thing. detroit eastern market is totally the same way. it is open to all walks of life. you can get tons of really great food there. and it is totally affordable. that is just the way it is. it is not done a really fancy. you go there, everyone shops there and you're done. >> all kinds of markets and stuff like that. you have great markets that it will be half mexican and it is a very typical chicago thing and it's all dirt cheap. the you are asking about the shame thing, which i think is interesting. food has this really visceral profound affect on people. like all, had some food once, let me tell you about it. everybody has a story. we can tell that some are not interested in food. most people, you know, most people have their own food culture. i think it's like some people react with this kind of feeling, that you must know all of these amazing bunch and amazing things about food and you must only dine on montego cheese and certain things and part of what we can do to not make people feel ashamed
with individual railroads. so you can get an exclusive contract, say between detroit and chicago, along a particular railroad line, you are able to maintain that line at a much cheaper cost than your arrival having to use roads or having to just bushwhack the open country. and by establishing those exclusive right-of-way, railroads got very cheap telegraph service. telegraph companies have the rights of way. by establishing those arrangements, unusual contractual arrangements which the courts were reluctant to challenge, and congress was reluctant to challenge, by doing that he was able to get around the limitations that state lawmakers have place on telegraph companies to the anti-monopoly laws. and those laws have been enacted as a response to morse. so you morse who fails, the state anti-monopoly laws, did he succeed by using the railroads to create the kind of monopolies -- >> are there any comparisons today for rise in an at&t and broadband and cell towers, et cetera? >> here's the comparison that really gets me. in 1996 congress enacted a law, open up competition. in local telecom
in the terrorism area, particularly christmas day bombing attempts of the flight inbound to detroit that could've been a very serious disaster in one way or the other. the administrations reaction was not seen as particularly surefooted. it is pretty amazing that we are here just about two months before the next election and somehow the president has an advantage on these terrorism issues. i guess the main event that was mentioned would be the killing of osama bin laden in may of 2011 as well as the president abandoning some of the policies that were so controversial early in his term. i thought i would start with you, maybe you want to add some other factors about how we have gotten to this place where the democrats think that terrorism and national security issues are such an advantage for them and they can basically wave them like a big flag at their convention and it often seems that mitt romney and the republicans are not quite on the run on those issues, silent to the point where afghanistan wasn't mentioned and it was glossed over this whole area that we have seen for decades as a real
. when some of these other folks said we should let detroit go bankrupt, when they said we should walk away from an industry that supports one in eight jobs in ohio, i said we are not going to go that way. i said american workers in and three years later the american auto industry has come roaring back with nearly 250,000 jobs. [applause] now you have got a choice. we can give more tax breaks to corporations that ship jobs overseas, or we can start rewarding corporations and companies for opening up new plans and planning new workers and bringing new jobs right here in ohio, right here in the united states of america, right here. [applause] now, i understand my opponent has been running around ohio claiming, don't -- , vote. but he has been running around claiming he is going to roll up his sleeves and take the fight to china. now, here is the thing. his experience has been owning companies that were call pioneers in the business of outsourcing jobs to countries like china. he made money, investing in companies that uprooted from here and went to china. pioneers. now you can't stand up
detroit michigan, a man that had so much vision in recognizing that not only were our roots from africa, but africa had to be a player on the world scene. he mentored me, and together with of the members that were there under my predecessor, the late and they break adam clayton powell, we, four of us, became the congressional black caucus. we did not get together just because we were men and women of color. we get together because we recognize that we were coming together with a vision of strength, our votes that something. we wanted to tell everybody, no matter where they left that whether or not they had a member of color it did not matter because we took the responsibility of this big for them wherever there were. can you imagine it to the years the 13 crew of 26 iraq another ten years, 42. forty-three. now the congressional black caucus is the largest carcass that we have in the house of representatives. >> among our members of. >> with all of the struggles that we suffered in the civil rights movement, all of them marching and praying and dying that people had done for us, please,
parts of the southern black population moved north to places like chicago, detroit, new york. blocks are going back to the south to impossible, the liberals cry. don't do know the south is full of rednecks and racists? what black families now to the contrary is the south is much better jobs and a better economic future, and more important into better place to raise their kids. kids don't learn to say thank you and yes, sir and no, ma'am. integral parts of the country or liberal public schools. they learn that in places like mod coming and green for. the mason-dixon line still shows up en masse but these days a lot of americans it's better to be on the southern side. how much better? numbers don't lie. according to the latest census figures the south was the fastest growing region in america over the last decade, up 14%. that's why factories open in southern states like alabama. that's why bmw opens facility and south to london. that's why atlanta, georgia, is a hub of commerce. the american liberal isn't -- and his blighted neighborhood looks upon all of this. he hates the south like
jobs. [applause] you remember my opponent wanted to let detroit go bankrupt. >> boo! >> don't boo -- >> vote! >> vote. [applause] >> so we said, no, too much is at stake. we're going to come together and reinvent a dying auto industry, and we put it back on top of the world. [cheers and applause] so what we did for autos, we want to do for manufacturing across the board. we've already created more than half a million new manufacturing jobs. so now what we have to do is to stop giving tax breaks to companies that are shipping jobs overseas. let's give them to companies that are investing right here in milwaukee, creating jobs right here in wisconsin. that's how we move forward. [cheers and applause] let's help, let's help big companies and small businesses double their exports. we can create a million new manufacturing jobs in the next four years. but it requires you to vote. it requires all of us to do our part. i want us to control our own energy. you know, after 30 years of not doing anything, we raised fuel standards so that by the middle of the next decade your cars and trucks
of our politics and the reason why these white-collar suburbs outside philadelphia, outside detroit, outside cleveland have shifted from republicans, democrats tend to know what we saw in 08 with places like northern virginia, suburbs of charlotte and raleigh and denver follow them, which is by the states are following them. michael bennet won 60% of college where women in 2010. so it wasn't just hispanics. as socially liberal white women in obama today in two days ago in the last poll is 56 hours 58%. >> we will just say abortion is high intensity shown both sides of the debate so it's important to keep in mind >> things like planned parenthood, finding a plan. whichever republican presidential nominee endorse, virtually every republican in the house has voted for. i agree, abortion is what it is a need to have this divide, but other elements as contraception came in in a way and all of is allowing obama to hold his foot among those women despite. >> another thing is mccain-feingold when you don't have soft dollars, you democrats as republicans in the 70s post the first wave having
of the detroit news. thank you all for joining us today. for as long as most folks can remember, the unions have given their time, labor and money to democrats only caseally breaking with tradition and endorsing a republican for president as they did with ronald reagan and george h.w. bush. this year they will keep with tradition and support president obama's re-election campaign. teamster president james p. hoffa, our speaker today, says the labor union with 1.4 million members supports president obama and has criticized republicans and mitt romney for favoring ceos over workers. after the rnc convention in tampa, he told the huffington post that romney wallets to annihilate -- wants to annihilate organized labor, but it's been a mixed bag during the obama administration. attempts to raise the minimum wage have failed even when democrats dominated the house and the senate. some union supporters say the democratic national committee took labor support for granted when they chose north carolina, a right-to-work state, with little union representation to host last week's convention. and free trade
the pacific. came home. married his high school sweetheart. got to good job in detroit. cute with the wave of prosperity with working class families at that time. had a little fishing cabin in the upper peninsula. one day he came home at old marine and sitting at table was his daughter, not wearing a brassiere and having hair under her arms and leg hair and with a guy that she identified only as zeke, who had sunglasses on, greasy hair and a guitar and said daddy we'll move in together. we aren't getting married because no one does that anymore. he is looking to his son for some reinforcement. his son has got united states flag swastika over it and son says i'm going to canada. i'm not going to fight. this is somebody else's war. if when he turns around to get help from his wife she is standing at kitchen stove saying to him, okay, big guy, how come i'm only one in this house that does the dishes and fixes meals anymore? that is what was going on. it was kind of 180 from how a lot of that generation had been raised to what they were experiencing in the their own families. >> host: one more
that looked a lot of like a spirit of st. louis. was called detroiter. she named it the american girl. she told the press, if an american boy can have great dreams, why can't an american girl? and she went allot of. she made it as far as -- and she crashed in the sea. but she crashed within inside an nor wee began tanker. they saved her. she very perhaps more than any other of the fliers, she understood the new world of celebrity because she said early on, anybody who -- the first woman who fries across is going to be famous. they're going to make money, they're going to be famous. i don't want to go back to the life of a dental hygienist in florida. why shouldn't i do this? it's my way out. what's fascinating, when you look at the archives, there were all of these letters to these fliers from men and women. the but the most saying take me along. the most poignant from women and the women saw, you know, they would -- they were -- there was one letter from a woman who had seven children but five had died, there was one woman who slung burgers in philadelphia and she offered to bring food. a
are counted, even the dad says that democrats in chicago, detroit and cleveland, i predict that we will win, that this nightmare will be over and america will finally be on the road to recovery. god bless you and thank you very much. [applause] >> as i have often said about gary bauer is one-of-a-kind in the liberals are glad about that. the house judiciary committee sits on the substitution committee. he believes the constitution means what it says and then it should be a mind of our founding fathers. imagine not. in fact he has never come without a copy of the constitution in this coat pocket. ladies and gentlemen, please welcome from the great state of iowa, representative steve king. [applause] ♪ >> wow, thank you. all right. thank you all very much. thanks for the welcome to ask rc and everyone contributing to make this conference what it is. and for me, sitting back listening to gary bauer speech, i am up clapping my hands, too. it gets me going and i'm wondering here what kind of a void he has left me to try to fill. but you know, i want to thank frc and i want to do it in this way
in the detroit metro area 44% of the vote as he did in 2008. not much going on for romney. wisconsin is a state where if they were going to crack the midwest code given what was happening with ohio they thought they could do it in wisconsin. the problem is twofold. if you look at the level of demographic change in wisconsin it is quite startling according to the population survey data. 3 point increase in share of minority voters and college graduates and 7 point decline among white on college voters eligible voters. these are huge changes that go exactly against what is in the interests of the romney team. maybe they thought if they nominated paul ryan they could take advantage of what they believed to be massive culturally conservative white working-class voter but doesn't seem to be happening. they are making some progress among white working-class voters according to the pole and some progress among college graduates but nowhere close to what is needed to take the state. they are not able to master the state in the face of demographic change and demographic patterns. florida is a state that
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)

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